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Need advice and support.

Hi I'm  a parent of a 6yo with asthma.we live in Houston texas,recently the weather has fallen into the 60s and sometimes 50s early mornings.From past experiences I have learnt that my child doesn't handle extreme changes in temperature too well in terms of his asthma symptoms.cold is definitely bad but too hot  or hot to cold is bad too.anyways he had a cold 3weeks ago which he recovered from and then a couple of days ago started coughing which got worse by the day,of course it was a matter of concern but there was no wheezing,sore throat or anything that the Dr (Pcp or Allergist),could point it to…so one said it's viral the other said probably some leftover inflammation in his lungs from the cold…currently he is taking oral steroids for the cough which has helped along with neb treatments and his regular control meds the qvar and montelukast.apart from the cough what's concerning is that his peak flow meter reading has been low  so he is in the yellow zone these days.its  50% of his normal but slowly getting better .

 1.)I don't understand what caused his cough,the only thing I can think of but the school nurse or his Allergist don't agree or "even want to consider" it is that, it's been in the 60s here but real feeling was sort of 50ish on certain days and he had been going out for recess…I feel that may have triggered the cough slowly….but nobody wants to be convinced or even consider it.i get the feeling as though they think I'm crazy or a paranoid mom….I don't know if ppl don't know that cold triggers asthma or they think that parents are not Drs so they don't know what they are talking abt.

2)is it better to keep him home until he rises back to his  normal peak flow reading,he is in first grade,yesterday I sent him to school even though he stayed in for recess he came home really tired and not looking good.the Dr didn't say anything about this issue.

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  • Shea

    Hi Chery, welcome to AAFA! I am sorry your little one is struggling with fatigue and cough. I am glad the prednisone is helping it some. It is hard to know the balance of what to let your child do and not do, especially when you arent there to monitor.

    (I have a 6 year old son with allergies and I have asthma/allergies myself and we decided on doing virtual school from home and enlisting in a homeschool co-op that is food allergy aware, and in which parents attend. But, that decision was based on a lot of things and works for us, it is definitely not the only option nor am I saying you should do that.)

    Even though I do that now, I do have allergy action plan for him– AAFA has a good one, the second one on this list (for childcare) has easy to see things you can checkmark for triggers including cold temperature changes:

    There is also places to write in special instructions on it. It is nice to have it in front of you when going over things with others (for me it has been).

    You could try to monitor him outside yourself at home, and see if you notice that it makes things worse for him– if it does then having an alternate recess activity is definitely a good idea in my book. 

    Sometimes others just dont get it (and they don't have to get it– but they do need to follow the plan and respect your decisions as the child's guardian.) I try to have them "get it" though– asthma is a serious condition, it is life threatening, (I think it is like 10 people die from asthma every day), and prednisone is not a fun med to be on, and is sometimes hard to come off of, so while he is on that and having a worse PFT, I dont think it is off base to have him stay home if your able to either. 

    Learning triggers is tough… As they can be indoor in schools– even secondhand pet dander gets into classrooms to the degree that those with allergic asthma or allergies are needing to use inhalers more frequently in classrooms with more pet-owners attending (second-hand pet dander is a huge trigger for both mt son and I.) 

    Has your son done any allergy tests?

    Our allergies have been bugging us–lots of stuffy nose and sneezing and blowing out stuff– and I am thinking it ragweed season so that could be it… So we do our outdoors exercise more toward the evenings when the ragweed pollen is lower. 

    I am hoping I will get to bed–( I had to stop one of the meds that helps me sleep for a few weeks while on an antibiotic and its been hard to get to sleep!) But I suppose I will try reading. 

    I hope some of that info is helpful and keep us posted.. I am sure more people will be chiming in.

  • IA-TXFisherman
    Chery posted:

    Hi I'm  a parent of a 6yo with asthma.we live in Houston texas,recently the weather has fallen into the 60s and sometimes 50s early mornings.From past experiences I have learnt that my child doesn't handle extreme changes in temperature too well in terms of his asthma symptoms.cold is definitely bad but too hot  or hot to cold is bad too.anyways he had a cold 3weeks ago which he recovered from and then a couple of days ago started coughing which got worse by the day,of course it was a matter of concern but there was no wheezing,sore throat or anything that the Dr (Pcp or Allergist),could point it to…so one said it's viral the other said probably some leftover inflammation in his lungs from the cold…currently he is taking oral steroids for the cough which has helped along with neb treatments and his regular control meds the qvar and montelukast.apart from the cough what's concerning is that his peak flow meter reading has been low  so he is in the yellow zone these days.its  50% of his normal but slowly getting better .

     1.)I don't understand what caused his cough,the only thing I can think of but the school nurse or his Allergist don't agree or "even want to consider" it is that, it's been in the 60s here but real feeling was sort of 50ish on certain days and he had been going out for recess…I feel that may have triggered the cough slowly….but nobody wants to be convinced or even consider it.i get the feeling as though they think I'm crazy or a paranoid mom….I don't know if ppl don't know that cold triggers asthma or they think that parents are not Drs so they don't know what they are talking abt.

    2)is it better to keep him home until he rises back to his  normal peak flow reading,he is in first grade,yesterday I sent him to school even though he stayed in for recess he came home really tired and not looking good.the Dr didn't say anything about this issue.

    Hi Chery,

    My thoughts are with you and your son. I hope he gets better soon! I live in San Antonio and my symptoms have worsened since the weather changes as well. I think your right and that has something to do with it. Like Houston, San Antonio went through a similar change recently and people with slight allergies and such have been struggling here. It makes sense from what you've shared, what I've noticed from people around me, and my own experience that the recent weather is a factor. You and your son hang in there. 

  • Brenda Silvia-Torma

    Hi @Chery, I'm so sorry that your son is experiencing some difficulty right now as the weather changes. Here are s a few resources that might help you as well as the school learn more about how weather can impact asthma symptoms:

    • AAFA Blog:
      • Note: This page also includes some weather/pollen/ozone tracking information for cities in the U.S. I use the AirNow website, since my triggers are ozone and particle pollution (along with illnesses). This might be a good resource for you and the school. If your son is triggered by high pollen days or air quality, could you ask the school to refer to these resources and give him indoor recess when the levels are high? 
    • AAFA Blog:
    • AAFA's (Houston, TX is #51 on the list)

    Does your son have a 504 plan for his asthma? To learn more about 504 plans, read AAFA's blog article,

    Keep us posted on how your kiddo is doing. Thanks!!

    Brenda 

  • Chery
    Shea posted:

    Hi Chery, welcome to AAFA! I am sorry your little one is struggling with fatigue and cough. I am glad the prednisone is helping it some. It is hard to know the balance of what to let your child do and not do, especially when you arent there to monitor.

    (I have a 6 year old son with allergies and I have asthma/allergies myself and we decided on doing virtual school from home and enlisting in a homeschool co-op that is food allergy aware, and in which parents attend. But, that decision was based on a lot of things and works for us, it is definitely not the only option nor am I saying you should do that.)

    Even though I do that now, I do have allergy action plan for him– AAFA has a good one, the second one on this list (for childcare) has easy to see things you can checkmark for triggers including cold temperature changes:

    There is also places to write in special instructions on it. It is nice to have it in front of you when going over things with others (for me it has been).

    You could try to monitor him outside yourself at home, and see if you notice that it makes things worse for him– if it does then having an alternate recess activity is definitely a good idea in my book. 

    Sometimes others just dont get it (and they don't have to get it– but they do need to follow the plan and respect your decisions as the child's guardian.) I try to have them "get it" though– asthma is a serious condition, it is life threatening, (I think it is like 10 people die from asthma every day), and prednisone is not a fun med to be on, and is sometimes hard to come off of, so while he is on that and having a worse PFT, I dont think it is off base to have him stay home if your able to either. 

    Learning triggers is tough… As they can be indoor in schools– even secondhand pet dander gets into classrooms to the degree that those with allergic asthma or allergies are needing to use inhalers more frequently in classrooms with more pet-owners attending (second-hand pet dander is a huge trigger for both mt son and I.) 

    Has your son done any allergy tests?

    Our allergies have been bugging us–lots of stuffy nose and sneezing and blowing out stuff– and I am thinking it ragweed season so that could be it… So we do our outdoors exercise more toward the evenings when the ragweed 

    Thank you so much Shea for such a detailed response.it felt good to read it. U are right about so many things in ure reply.Also last year in school he stayed indoors throughout the year and believe me he did pretty good with his asthma symptoms that arise without any apparent cause.

    He is getting Allergy shots but started just recently.

     

     

  • Chery
    Brenda Silvia-Torma posted:

    Hi @Chery, I'm so sorry that your son is experiencing some difficulty right now as the weather changes. Here are s a few resources that might help you as well as the school learn more about how weather can impact asthma symptoms:

    • AAFA Blog:
      • Note: This page also includes some weather/pollen/ozone tracking information for cities in the U.S. I use the AirNow website, since my triggers are ozone and particle pollution (along with illnesses). This might be a good resource for you and the school. If your son is triggered by high pollen days or air quality, could you ask the school to refer to these resources and give him indoor recess when the levels are high? 
    • AAFA Blog:
    • AAFA's (Houston, TX is #51 on the list)

    Does your son have a 504 plan for his asthma? To learn more about 504 plans, read AAFA's blog article,

    Keep us posted on how your kiddo is doing. Thanks!!

    Brenda 

    Hi Brenda, thanks for the links regarding asthma.My son does have a 504 plan,he also has allergies to peanuts and all tree-nuts.so he sits far from his classmates during lunch with another kid who has certain food allergies too.last year I had them keep him indoors during recess  throughout the year,with post Harvey effects and stuff it seemed appropriate to do so.this year the school wants me to let him go out unless there's an issue with his health, I just send a note to keep him indoors for that day or so.I had previously submitted a Dr's note stating that wen the temperature is 50 or below and a high temp range that I can't remember for summer, not to send him out..but I was told that I should keep a check on the temp myself and let the teacher know wen it's unsuitable fo him to go out..I guess that's ok.

     The Dr also thinks that it's ok for him to go out,I do want him to go and play with his friends but I  feel uncomfortable about it,in summer it's the heat,then pollen,in winter it would be something else etc.".i guess if I was around I would feel better".this outdoor recess is also something that I can't decide on.he needs the socializing and interaction too …can't decide !

     

     

  • Brenda Silvia-Torma

    Hi Chery, You're most welcome!! Could he wear a scarf during the winter to help warm the air before he breathes it in? Could that help?  

    Brenda

  • Melissa G

    Hi Chery, does your son struggle with his asthma when he is playing? Does he have exercise induced asthma? It sounds like he also has seasonal allergies, does he take anything for his allergies?

    You can also check out our sister site .

  • Chery
    Melissa G posted:

    @Chery how is your son doing? Is there anything else we can help you with?

    Hi Melissa thx for asking,he is doing better .we are doing a follow up with his Allergist today on the same condition but the coughing is much better.Thanks.

  • K8sMom2002

    Chery, just chiming in a bit late … glad you've got a chance to ask your allergist this question. 

    Like your DS, I get triggered by sudden changes in temperature, and exercise was one of my first known triggers as well. Does your doctor suggest that your kiddo pre-treat before vigorous exercise?

    Sometimes my lungs just stay twitchy for awhile after a flare … my doc says that my body has to settle down back to its baseline. During those times, I have to avoid things that usually don't trigger me.

    That's what so great about having a good and — your doc can write in specific instructions for the school, and then the school can clearly see it's not mom, but medical school trained doc saying these things.

    I love what Shea said — they don't have to understand or agree with the plan completely, but they do need to follow it.  can help you with all sorts of things when it comes to managing your kiddo's asthma. 

    We're here for you … let us know what the doc says!