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High Level of Physical Activity Associated with Poorer Asthma Control in Females

Earlier studies on the levels of physical activity in asthma patients compared with controls have yielded varying results. We have previously reported that high versus moderate levels of physical activity were associated with higher prevalence of wheezing, especially in females. Here we studied the levels of physical activity in young patients with asthma and healthy subjects and their effect on asthma control.

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Comments 4

  • Kathy P

    Not sure I really understand this one. I wonder if it's because woman are more used to pushing through things.

  • Andrea Roberts

    I don't understand this either. At least moderate, aerobic activity is usually recommended to improve and/or prevent asthma symptoms. I wonder if the studies accounted for pre-treating before exercise, or even accounted for people already diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma.

    In my own experience, I do much better with regular exercise. In fact, if I am having an excerbation, or diagnosed bronchitis, there comes a point in my recovery that I know I must begin to resume my exercise activities for continued or improved recovery.

  • Allison

    I did not get this either. Perhaps we can ask for more clarification from some of the doctors that we know. I was diagnosed with asthma when my son was young after I had been dealing with his asthma and food allergies for a few years, and was put on Advair and everything improved. I took up running, lost about 15-20 pounds, came off Advair, no longer showed any signs of it when I went for tests, and was even dismissed from a university study because I didn't qualify (they were looking to see what effect something nonmedical would have on it).

    But I like Kathy's theory!

  • kandicejo
    Andrea Roberts posted:

    I don't understand this either. At least moderate, aerobic activity is usually recommended to improve and/or prevent asthma symptoms. I wonder if the studies accounted for pre-treating before exercise, or even accounted for people already diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma.

    In my own experience, I do much better with regular exercise. In fact, if I am having an excerbation, or diagnosed bronchitis, there comes a point in my recovery that I know I must begin to resume my exercise activities for continued or improved recovery.

    If I've read the abstract correctly, they are reporting that it's associated with high levels and not moderate levels of activity. It seems moderate levels do not have the same effect. Very interesting that it's only females though. I'm curious to see if they will be studying the why of that.