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Do I need a totally pet-free home?

My pulmo has told me to stay away from pets. And to avoid long commutes to work. He says they can trigger me. Well I am still looking for work so I guess I don’t have a commute now.

But my parents have a pet that stays in his room. I don’t go near him. Does anyone know if that’s enough or do you need to stay in a pet free home? He’s been in our home since before I moved out and back in. I was always allergic to him. But after asthma I am not sure if he could be causing my frequent flare ups.

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  • kira

    The number one recommendation from allergists is that if you are allergic to an animal you should not live with it and you should practice avoidance.

    Especially when it affects your breathing and your activities of daily living.

    You are a human and have a right to breathe. Your health and wellness is important.

    You shouldnt be forced to be around something that is making you ill. Avoidance is an option.

  • Aaliyah

    The number one recommendation from allergists is that if you are allergic to an animal you should not live with it and you should practice avoidance. Especially when it affects your breathing and your activities of daily living. You are a human and have a right to breathe. Your health and wellness is important. You shouldnt be forced to be around something that is making you ill. Avoidance is an option.

  • Help

    Hugs — you’re in a tight spot, and I’m hoping your family can help you. It may not be a situation that you can completely solve right away, but in the meantime, as you negotiate your way through it and better understand your allergist’s specific advice for you, could you …

    1. Check out AAFA’s tips for how to manage with a pet that you can’t immediately re-home?

    2. Ask your parent to help reduce dander transfer by regular vacuuming and carpet cleaning, using a lint roller, and regular baths for your parent’s pet?

    3. Ask your parent to use an air cleaner in their room?

    4. If you’re going to be there long-term and re-homing is not a possibility, could you ask that your parents consider taking out carpets and upgrade to upholstery that’s easier to clean? It’s actually a win-win for people who have pets — these things will need to be replaced less often because they don’t pick up the wear and tear of a pet.

    5. if you absolutely can’t be around a pet per your doctor’s advice and your parent can’t re-home, could your parent help you in the move to a new dander-free home? Or is there another relative without a pet that you could live with?

  • kira

    I had tried all of the above things with “eliminating” and “reducing”– and my health deteriorated in the process. Then (after the fact of course) I looked at the studies and none of them show it lessens the dander enough to stop allergies. In fact, they showed even indirect exposure brought in on others into pet-free environments causes significant problems for the subjects studied. I wouldn’t waste my time or money on that if I could go back.

    It really makes me mad when people put a desire to keep an animal in the home above a family member’s health who is struggling to breathe. The home shouldnt be the test area– the allergens should be removed when a person who is sick is experiencing very bad symptoms. Thst is their hine they should be safe and a place to heal. Or its no home at all. Obviously when you are an adult you cannot make another adult move an animal out of the home. You have to leave if they wont. But usually theyll realize they were in the wrong for what they do– well maybe 50-50. My parents came around but I did need to get doctors notes. I still resent them for that because my allergic disease put me on my death bed and caused a heart attack and they still made me do all that. So irrational. So distespectful and hurtful. I am pretty sure I will never get over my anger issues wuth the way I was treated through the whole process. But if you look up the allergists top recommendation it us to not live with the pet you are allergic to. It can cause worsening chronic health issues that significantly affect your ability to work and live.

  • miri

    I am with my parents only temporarily. At least that’s is what I want. I’m looking for work so I will move into a new home once I find a job.

    For now my parents have someone who comes in to clean the place up everyday. And there’s no carpeting it’s all hardwood.

    Shea- I think we just realised that the pet could be causing issues. We are looking for a new home but he’s quite old. And I might leave when I find a job. So a lil confused on what to do.

    I agree. It’s a literal version of people love their pets more than their own kids. My allergies started causing breathing issues last year September and maybe that’s why they don’t understand it. They think people are born with allergies.

  • kira

    The dog we had was old too with health issues– needed frequent bathroom and special food. My brother housed him at his house and my parents covered the food/vet costs. Often you can talk to friends and family about at least temporariltly housing the pet due to a family member being sick and people will help out.

  • miri

    Thanks. Will ask them to look for a new home. He’s actually my sisters but she left him with my parents when she relocated to another country. I’ll see if my grandparents or someone else will take him.

  • Aaliyah

    It really made a difference for me, my flares/attacks were much less frequent after being pet-free home environment, and I havent needed to go up on prednisone (bouncing up and down on prednisone was the worst!).