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Any suggestions for how to feel better when you feel you can’t breath

Today I feel like it is very hard to breath for me and this happen usually whe it is raining. I used all my medication and stuff but feel tire no energy and pain in my chest pressure in my head . Any tips to feel better 

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  • Pljohns

    Yvette-unfortunately the weather plays havoc with a lot of us-even when we use all of our meds.  I know for me, it really makes me feel tired/fatigued and just awful.  Some people here get relief from using sinus rinses but others of us have found no matter what, the barametric pressure makes our heads hurt and feel totally like our head is "vacuum packed".  Sorry-wish I had more suggestions-

  • Kathy P

    Hugs Yvette – I hope you are feeling better. Is it the barometric pressure that you think is the trigger? For me, rain means mold – my asthma flares right after it stops raining.

  • Shea

    Vicks vapor rub,  and eucalyptus and tea tree essential oils in a diffuser really help me (they have anti-mold, anti-fungal properties and dont bother my asthma) but you should try a small amount first when your feeling well to make sure it doesnt bother you. 

  • LK

    Welcome, Yvette!  Sorry the weather affects you, too!  Even taking all my meds on schedule, it still affects me, too.  I take Claritin as needed and it keeps that heavy, sleepy feeling away from my sinuses.  Have you talked with your doctor about something like that?

  • Yvette

    Hi thanks for the reply , I did but my doctor wasn’t very helpful. I tried to explain what I was feeling and he basically told me that I wa fine , just take your medication. I am actually looking for a different specialist. 

  • Yvette
    Shea posted:

    Vicks vapor rub,  and eucalyptus and tea tree essential oils in a diffuser really help me (they have anti-mold, anti-fungal properties and dont bother my asthma) but you should try a small amount first when your feeling well to make sure it doesnt bother you. 

    Thanks for the advice I just bought Vick’s vapor run and it helps I’ll try the diffuser soon

  • Yvette
    Kathy P posted:

    Hugs Yvette – I hope you are feeling better. Is it the barometric pressure that you think is the trigger? For me, rain means mold – my asthma flares right after it stops raining.

    Thanks for hugs. I will have to explore Mold allergies but I believe I was tested in the past and nothing came up.

  • Kathy P

    Sorry the doc is not more helpful. Looking for another specialist sounds like a good idea.

  • K8sMom2002

    Hi, Yvette … that sounds super frustrating! I hope you're feeling a bit better today.

    My breathing is definitely affected by the weather. AAFA has two really helpful blogs about how the weather affects asthma and allergies. 

      Could you ask your current doctor (and definitely your next specialist!) if you should change up your medications if the weather (rain or a barometric pressure drop) triggers your asthma?

      For instance, my doctor tells me to pre-treat before I do vigorous activity because that's a trigger for my asthma. And our "sick plan" for both me and my DD changes the way we take our medications if we get an upper respiratory infection like a cold, since colds can trigger asthma for us.

      Keeping a symptom diary might help you show your doctor how your asthma is affecting you.

      Another thing: could you show your doctor AAFA's "asthma zones" chart and ask how to tell if you are in a yellow or red zone? AAFA's that you can print out and take to your doctor also uses the green, yellow and red zones.

    • K8sMom2002

      It's our pleasure! I hope your doctor can give you a good plan forward and help figure things out! I'll be interested to hear what you find out. 

    • Angeleyes101

      I just joined this forum tonight and I saw your post.  My asthma and allergies are also triggered by the barometric pressure and weather.  Have you tried a neti pot?  They do help once you are comfortable using it.  This will clear out your sinuses and give you head pain relief.  

      Feel better, Gerry

    • K8sMom2002

      Hi, Gerry! Thanks for the suggestion! Do you do this year round or just during times when your environmental allergies are bad?

      For me, my asthma issues and the barometric pressure are almost separate from my allergies, which are mainly pollen. Even in the winter, when I have little to no pollen issues, if the weather changes suddenly, I have issues. 

      I'd never thought about using a nasal rinse or neti pot during those times.

    • Angeleyes101

      My allergies are year round, each season bringing something different.  I use the neti Pot whenever I feel the need. I always have congestion, I am also on Flonase which helps.  It’s crazy but as soon as the pressure drops my nose starts running and  I start  coughing.  

      I would say I am like you, my asthma is a SOMEWHAT separate thing, although I was diagnosed as an allergic asthmatic. Which I’m sure you know is asthma supposidely  triggered by allergies. You would think with all they can do medically they could do more about allergies and asthma. Are you on meds as a preventative?  I take singular, loratadine, and Flonase everyday.

      stay well, Gerry

    • Megan Roberts

      I struggle with sinus issues /headaches as well @Angeleyes101 but haven't narrowed down the trigger for that yet. I wonder if it is changes in the weather /barometric pressure. My asthma is definitely seasonally worse due to various triggers — seasonal allergies, dust, mold, humidity and especially cold. I get so excited for the spring every year, completely forgetting the misery that comes along with it! But I have gotten my allergic asthma more under control with a combo LABA inhaler, montelukast/singulair, and an albuterol inhaler.

      @Yvette I'm sorry your doctor was not helpful in looking into what your triggers may be. But the good news is you already are paying attention to those things — and as k8smom2002 suggested keeping a symptom tracker/ diary will help you figure out even more of your triggers. Do you notice you have flare-ups of asthma when around other possible sources of mold? Like wet leaf piles in the fall or in a musty basement? Or do you have seasonal /pollen allergies as well? Just curious if it's mold, pollen or barometric changes causing your flare ups. I'm sure the symptom tracker will help you get to the bottom of it! 

      Hugs as you try and figure things out.  

    • K8sMom2002

      There's not a specific chart – one helpful resource is this tip on the .

      There are apps out there … and some people like @Pljohns has a spreadsheet that she keeps. A chart with the following things might be helpful:

      • What was I doing?
      • When did it start?
      • When did it get better
      • What did I do to make it better?
      • What was the weather?
      • What was the pollen level like?
      • What triggers was I around?
    • Pljohns

      I used an app on my phone for almost 3 years, then the developer didn't update it for the IOS so it quit working and worse yet, I couldn't get my info out of it!  That was a hard lesson-I lost 3 years worth of data.  Since then, I have begun putting it in excel so i know I have it.  I created a basic worksheet with peak flow, FEV1 and notes (free text field).  I have a tab for each month and another tab for the year.  I have colored coded it by when I have a trigger bothering me, when I add more meds, when I see the doc etc so at a glance I can see what is what.  I like it because I can see a month for several years or look at the entire year.  It took me about a week to gather all of my past info and put it in the sheets, but it has been well worth it.  i can now tell my doc  which month's I seem to get sick in, which ones the weather gives me a hard time in and when I seem to do my best.  It's nice to have control of the data and not have to worry about someone not updating the program and it being gone again.

    • LK
      Pljohns posted:

      I used an app on my phone for almost 3 years, then the developer didn't update it for the IOS so it quit working and worse yet, I couldn't get my info out of it!  That was a hard lesson-I lost 3 years worth of data.  Since then, I have begun putting it in excel so i know I have it.  I created a basic worksheet with peak flow, FEV1 and notes (free text field).  I have a tab for each month and another tab for the year.  I have colored coded it by when I have a trigger bothering me, when I add more meds, when I see the doc etc so at a glance I can see what is what.  I like it because I can see a month for several years or look at the entire year.  It took me about a week to gather all of my past info and put it in the sheets, but it has been well worth it.  i can now tell my doc  which month's I seem to get sick in, which ones the weather gives me a hard time in and when I seem to do my best.  It's nice to have control of the data and not have to worry about someone not updating the program and it being gone again.

      Lynn, My phone did an update last fall and all of a sudden the asthmaMD app wouldn't work with it.  If the app you are referring to, it was updated a little while ago for Iphones. 

      I really like how you've put it on excel, though!  Sounds like it works even better!

    • Pljohns

      The one I used was asthma tracker-super simple and a really nice app-customizable and everything but it cost me 3 years worth of data.  I will say, after taking the time to put everything in excel, it was really nice to be able to look at an entire year and see when I had problems and then look at previous years and see if I had problems during the same time.  REALLY gave me a lot of insight into when I have problems and when I don't.  It's on my list to talk to my pulmo about on Thurs when i see him.

    • LK

      Lynn, Yes the app works now.  I find that my peak flow meter numbers don't help me all that much though.  Even when I know I'm having trouble breathing, my numbers are about the same as when I am doing well.  Confusing!!   I have a pulmonary doctor appointment in a week or so and will ask him about that.

    • Pljohns

      Lisa,  I've always been a number cruncher and when I'm having problems, my numbers tank but my old, really good pulmo, always told me to go by not just numbers, but how I feel too because not everyone's numbers reflect what trouble they are having.

       

    • LK

      Lynn, Thankfully, my pulmo is similar.  He goes by how I feel, too.  Is there ever a time when we get this figured out or is it always changing?  (Our asthma)

    • Pljohns

      I think we're out of luck getting it figured out-just when we think we're making progress, it changes on us again!

    • LK

      Good thing we all have each other and have wonderful senses of humor!! 

    • Pljohns

      AMEN-I don't know where I'd be without this place-wait-yes I do-still hiding in the bathroom stall to do a neb or not doing it at all!  Instead, here I sit with a mask on and no longer afraid of what people say-I do what I need to when I need to.  You all keep me laughing too-and that's the best part-we can make each other laugh when we need to and give a shoulder when we need that too-best friends ANYWHERE

    • K8sMom2002

      Yvette, did you ever get an appointment with a different specialist? I'm hoping you found one that was helpful OR you were able to talk with your current allergist and get some better ideas on how to manage things.

      Lynn and Lisa are so right about the support here … I really value the support I get, and hearing that I'm not alone. You know what? You're not alone, either!

    • Yvette

      I have an appointment this Thusrday with a NEW specialist and I hope I can find some answers. I am starting to believe that I dont ONLY have asthma but maybe allergies or something . I will let you know what happen. Thanks for all the support and suggestions. The day I wrote the post here I was so sad with all the symptoms but now I feel better that we are al together in this and we can cope better.

      Thanks

       

    • Pljohns

      Yvette-I'm so glad you have a new specialist.  Hopefully he can find some answers for you and give you a plan so you don't have such a hard time.  You are right-we are all in this together and this forum has the most AMAZING support!

    • Ironmom316

      My asthma is primarily due to animals, but i have many allergies as well.  I stopped eating dairy about 8 years ago and that has significantly reduced my attacks.  It reduces phlegm in the lungs.  There are so many dairy alternatives now so its not difficult.  

    • K8sMom2002

      IronMom316, welcome and it sounds like you kept a close eye on what triggered your asthma. What's your favorite dairy-free milk?

      Yvette, did you meet with the new specialist? I hope you got some good ideas and options!

    • Megan Roberts

      Welcome @Ironmom316! I am trying to go dairy-free for the same reason right now. For me the hardest thing to give up is yogurt –there is no good substitute I've found so far. Do you have any dairy free yogurts you like? 

      Glad you have found some relief by changing your diet. 

    • Ironmom316

      I really like Silk.  Have you tried that?  I usually add granola, almoda, and honey too.  

    • Megan Roberts

      I don't think I've tried that brand, I've tried a bunch of others though. Will give it a try – -thanks! (Maybe adding granola and other ingredients will help, as well.)

    • Tiffany F.

      @Yvette obviously this advice is not for emergencies, but I have noticed that breathing and feelings of shortness of breath can be very mental as well as physical.  When you feel that sense of panic come on because you cant breathe well, you can make it worse just thinking about it.   

      My therapist helped me realize this when she handed me a straw and told me to breathe through it regularly.   I took my regular breaths and started to feel panic come on… I couldnt get enough air!!   Then we stopped, I calmed down and we started to work on the mind.  We counted as I slowly inhaled deep breaths, focused my thoughts on the counting.  I breathed through the straw again. i was able to get enough air.  It wasnt COMFORTABLE, it was not pleasant.  But, I was able to breathe.  

      We only use something like 20% of the oxygen we actually take in.  The rest is breathed out on exhale.  Our bodies are amazingly resiliant and can adjust to less.  Obviously we dont want this long term but in a short-term sitautaion until you can get more help (like taking your rescue meds, other meds, getting to ER), remember that there is a lot of power in the mind.  Your brain is sending thousands of signals at every moment.  When your brain is panicking, your pulse picks up, your body starts wanting MORE oxygen than it really needs because there is a sense of deprivation and panic.  

      Learn to control your mind as best you can — learn to meditate and slow your breathing. Work on counting your breaths and doing the slow inhales/exhales and continuously reverting your mind to distractions (your happy places, counting, counting sheep or objects in your mind) have your mental game plan ready before you need it.

      I have a history of panic attacks where I am very short on breath and this has been the #1 key thing to help me above any meds.

      My grandfather had COPD/Emphysema and lung cancer (terrible).   A number of times, my mom was able to get his breathing under control JUST by the way she spoke to him, by calming him down, getting him distracted and focused on counting and taking slow deep breaths until his meds kicked in.

    • K8sMom2002

      Tiffany, just catching up with this thread, and wow, your suggestions brought back a lot of memories for me with my mom, who had COPD. And my own doc, during my worst exacerbations, would always remind me of that, too. 

      Yvette, hope things are going well for you and you were able to get some answers from that specialist.