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A Little Contemplation of the Asthma Zones chart . . . and some humor! (I hope!)

A little contemplation here.  

I was rereading the Asthma Zones chart with green, yellow and red zones showing breathing that is Good, Getting Worse and Difficult.  It occurred to me that my breathing is almost always in the Yellow zone – sometimes closer to the Green or the Red but never completely in the Green.  I can't tell you when the last cough-free day was (years ago), let alone when the last full day or partial day I had where I didn't have some chest tightness or shortness of breath.    

Just kind of sobering to realize that.  Guess that is why it is called "severe" asthma.      

So, I was wondering how many of you are similar in this regard?  

(Not in the slow realization process,    but in always or almost always being in the Yellow zone.)

Lisa

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  • Shea

    I am!!!

    I mean like right after a breathing treatment Im OK but I pretty much wake up wheezy, get wheezy and short of breath when I exert myself especially outside or if I run even a short amount… Or if walking a lot even– especially when it is humid outside. I live in the yellow mostly. 

    And I am not going up on the steroids– I have been stuck at 20mgs prednisone forever because everytime I go lower I get in red and then need a shot and a big dise and taper. I am not going up on prednisone to search for the green zone just to lose it again as I taper and be here in yellow on 20mg still. Nope. Been there done that routine enough.

    As of today I am actually on day 3 of being down to 18mg prednisone a day, and if I have to, I will be adding a midday neb treatment. I am just thinking the inhaled steroids might be enough to keep me where I am at but on less oral steroids… and I am sick of the prednisone side effects. 

    It will be a struggle going to Epcot theme park with the family tomorrow– I will have to pace myself and tell them to slow down and that I need a break at different times. There will be times I will need my inhaler(s). There will be times I will be worried about my heart and if I am pushing myself too hard. But mostly I will be trying to ignore my symptoms, and walk through them, and try to enjoy the time for everything else– the sights and rides and smiles on Tommy's face. I will have my portable neb with in the car in case I get into the red and then I will have to get to the car quickly because I cannot pack the nebulizer in my backpack it will be too heavy to carry– I will already be carrying my inhalers, epipen, benadryl, Tommys allergy stuff, my wallet and glasses and sunscreen and possibly ponchos .. and a water .. and that all is heavy enough on my back.

    So I feel ya LK!

  • LK

    I am glad of your company, Shea!  Sorry you have to be here, too, though.  

    I hope you are successful on the lower dose of pred and that you have a wonderful day tomorrow and please do take the necessary breaks for yourself.  Your DS will love the trip!

  • Melissa G

    Lisa and Shea, I am sorry to hear this. Glad you two have "common ground" just not something you want to share.  

    With realizing this, is this something you could bring up to your doctors and maybe some adjustments could be made so you can get to the green zone?

  • LK

    Thanks, Melissa, I am trying to patiently wait to see if I show an improvement with the Xolair shots.  Took the third one yesterday so it will be at least one more month before the doctors say there may be an improvement.  

    Also, the allergist has me scheduled for a VCD test in mid June.  Hoping that give us some useful information, too.

  • Pljohns

    Shea and Lisa-so sorry you both wake up to mornings starting out like that.  I do sometimes, but I’m lucky that it’s not every day.  I’ve been there done that on the pred too Shea- months getting from 80mg down to 5 so I could quit.  I hate the side effects and don’t want to take the junk.  My hat is off to you for taking it daily and being OK with that just being wha you need to do.  

    You know, our insurance has partnered with a health coaching company and it’s free for a year so DH and I signed up to try and lose some weight.  She calls once a week to go over how things are going and there is always a topic she wants to talk about.  yesterday, it was what medication I’m on and what keeps me motivated to continue to take it no matter what-I really just wanted to say REALLY-my motivation-I want to BREATHE!!!  You could tell she had no clue about asthma.  I think that’s the motivation for all of us-breathing and some normalcy to life.  

    I’m a number cruncher and since today is the last of May, I took a few minutes to look back at my May stats in Excel, compared to last month and last May.  It’s hard when there isn’t improvement in numbers no matter what you have done. I guess that was part of what made me decide it was time for a change in meds-if what I was doing wasn’t making a difference, then why do it, why take more meds that don’t seem to be doing anything?  So, I dropped my AM meds and so far am doing fine.   Maybe, just maybe, being post-menopausal has helped something!

    I wish for you both a time when you could wake up and do whatever you want to during the day without having problems, go places with your son Shea, and not have to pack a suitcase of “just in case” stuff.  Maybe that is a day we can all get to.

  • LK
    Pljohns posted.  

    -my motivation-I want to BREATHE!!!   I think that’s the motivation for all of us-breathing and some normalcy to life.  

     

    Lynn,  Yep!  That sums it up in a nutshell!!  

  • Kathy P

    Hugs Shea and Lisa. I don't think there is ever a day I don't cough, but I think that is more post nasal drip. I seem to have different coughs! 

    Have you guys seen AAFA's My Life With Asthma report about the impact of severe / uncontrolled asthma? You can the report at

  • LK

    Thank you, Kathy.  Yes, I did read that report when I downloaded it a few weeks ago.  The complete report a few weeks ago that I read does has a lot of interesting data from the patient survey.  I don't remember how I accessed the report back then.

    When I clicked on each of the four links just now (on the page you have a link for above) all four links only sent me back to the same page I started on.   Is there a way to see the complete survey again from the AAFA website?

  • Kathy P

    I don't think the actual survey questions are available if that is what you are asking. There was a recent blog as well that pulls out more of the info. 

  • LK

    Thanks Kathy, that link has a little more information than the previous one but the links in it still send me back to the first link.  The full report I saw has 31 pages of charts and results about the patient survey.

    Not sure how I found the link but it lists how many patients took the survey, how it divided them into two groups of "severe uncontrolled" and "not severe uncontrolled".  It shows the percentages for each group of things like Emergency Room Visits, Frequency of Thoughts About Asthma, Asthma's Impacts on Personal Relationships, Emotional Impact, Limitations of Activities, etc.  

     I'll see if I can upload it from my computer.

  • Kathy P

    Ack! I know what happened! We made a change to have the short URL go to the page instead of the PDF. But the webpage and the blog were using the short URL for the PDF. 

    I'll get it fixed in the morning. 

  • LK

    Oh!  Thanks for figuring it out!!  I'm never sure if I understand computers as much as I think I do !!  

    That 1987 Computer Science degree doesn't have a lot of relevancy nowadays!!  

  • K8sMom2002

    Lisa, what a great topic! I think lots of people think of asthma as something that you find yourself in the yellow zone, take a puff or two from an inhaler, and boom, you're green and good to go.

    But for folks like you and Shea, that's not always the case. And even for me — my asthma would be classified as mild-to-moderate persistent asthma — some days or weeks, it seems like I live in the yellow zone. 

    I think the important thing is to work with our doctor to get to the best place we can be – threading the needle through quality of life, medication risks and benefits, and other considerations like financial and other comfort zones. Some things are right for some people, but not for others.

  • Pljohns

    I agree-it's been hard for me to not just look at the numbers but to go by the symptoms too-mostly my numbers are in the low end of green but i frequently have symptoms that are yellow symptoms.  Thankfully, not here lately, but in the past, it was every day, all day.  I'm just wondering if over time, if asthma can be reclassified from severe uncontrolled to mild or moderate???  UGH I would give anything if i had a doctor i could talk to!!!

  • LK

    Thanks, Cynthia.  I appreciate your perspectives on so many things!!

  • LK

    Lynn,  I am so grateful that you are doing better!!  I don't see why asthma cannot be reclassified?    I've read that it can change over time, so if sometimes it changes for the worse shouldn't it also be possible that it changes for the better??  Here's hoping!!  

  • Amber Says Shine

    I'm so grateful for this community, because I feel like I live in the Yellow a lot; it's annoying and can be scary.  You all help me feel so understood and much less alone!  If I have a day without coughing, it's a happy surprise   I take Advair twice a day and I'm okay on that, but I still find the asthma-related congestion and coughing frustrating. I've been at the lower (orange?) end of the Yellow zone for the past week with excessive coughing and wheezing, so I'm going to the doctor today to see if I need a prednisone burst or some other intervention.  Stress is a major trigger and I have a very stressful job (clinical social work).  Exercising too intensely is also a trigger.  I keep a careful eye on my heart rate and breathing rhythm, so as to stay in the okay zone.  It would be so nice to be in the Green Zone on the regular!  Maybe I need different meds ongoing.  We'll see what the doctor says today.  Much love to you all. 

  • LK

    Hi Amber!    I like your thought of an "Orange" level!  

    Sorry you are having a rough time.  I hope you and your doctor figure out something to help you breathe better and cough, wheeze less.  Coughing is so tiresome and tiring.

    Let us know how you are doing, please!

  • Pljohns

    Hi Amber-welcome to the board 

    I hope you can get some relief after you see the doctor today.  Coughing wears me out and just makes things worse.  It's like my old pulmo said "cough, cough, cough, inflame, inflame, inflame"  She said the more you cough, the worse the inflammation gets.  I can always tell when the cough gets the inflammation worse because I start to "rattle" when I cough and then I know it's really bad.feel better vibes coming your way.

  • K8sMom2002

    Amber, sounds like you have a good plan to talk to your doc! Could you mention the problems with exercise specifically if you haven't already? My doctor has recommended that I pre-treat before strenuous exercise — and that's not just at the gym, but any time I do heavy chores that can get my heart rate up in the cardio range – say, climbing up and down ladders.

    And it also sounds like you have a great handle on your triggers. You've shared some really great ideas about  … what other things does your doctor recommend for you when you're deep in the yellow zone? 

  • LK
    Pljohns posted:

    Coughing wears me out and just makes things worse.  It's like my old pulmo said "cough, cough, cough, inflame, inflame, inflame"  She said the more you cough, the worse the inflammation gets.  

    Lynn,  I had never looked at all my coughing making the inflammation, worse but it makes a ton of sense!!  That explains a lot!!  Thank you for posting that helpful information!

  • Amber Says Shine

    Wow, thanks for the support everyone! Doc prescribed me a prednisone burst, so I'll start taking that and enjoy the side effects for a few days, haha. She said if I'm not better with this, we'll look at other interventions. I also take my rescue inhaler a little bit before I exercise. Haven't been very good with that lately, so I need to be more mindful. I think it's the whole, "I feel good, I don't need these extra meds right now" kind of thing. Here's to managing our symptoms however they show up!

  • Shea

    I am different than the average asthmatic because asthma is really a symtom of my disease Churg-Strauss Syndrome– which is a severe chronic allergic disease– and so the prednisone I take orally many people with CSS have to be on some type of maintenence dose. My doctors are working with me to get to that lowest dose. My asthma symtoms can often be helped with less oral and more inhaled steroids, but the allergic eosinophils can travel throughout my skin, blood vessels, and organ tissues so one thing I like about my asthma is it is an indicator that I am around something that I shouldnt be around– if it wasnt making me wheeze then I might inhale a lot more and it might mess me up more. That is why avoidance is my favorite method of control. 

    I did make it through Epcot today. But not so well. Not too horrible though either. First of all– apparently service/emotional support animals are allowedd on rides now. Rides at a theme park. Ugh. And of course I am stuck there in line near one. Thank GOD my place in line was a little distanced but I was worried because they were in a fast pass lane and it looked like our lines were going to converge and then I would have to do/say something. Luckily my line went on the slow moving coaster ride through imagination land and I was the last one that particular coaster and they were to be on the next one.. What if she would've gotten on right behind me and Id be stuck in an enclosed area near my biggest allergic/asthma trigger– one that effects not just for my asthma but my entire allergic disease?! It is really not fair. Anyways…. That was our first ride. The slow moving ciaster stops and we get out in this Imagination lab and the dog does come in a few minutes later. I move as far away as I can. When we get outside my hands are red and rashy on the tops of them. I grab out my wipes and keep moving on.

    I did pretty well dealing with the heat and walking– although my bag was heavy and it was tough. 

    Another slow ride through spaceship earth ( that takes you through the history of humans from cavemen to internet in a 15 minute ride inside of a large golf ball shaped building) got stuck for 5 minutes as we were moving backwards on a slant in the midst of stars… and it got stuffy– it started to freak me out, but it got moving again before I got too clausterphobic. But it kinda made me never want to go on a ride again between those two things. 

    I dont want to be too much of a Negative Nancy but… I am OK with not going to a theme park for a good while. Or ever. 

    The fake service dog issue is roaming the local papers again and more people are realizing that there is a problem with no regulations snd people bringing pets everywhere: 

    So this has to do with living in the yellow for me because dander is just getting outta control and you cant go anywhere these days with this problem not being addressed if you are allergic– youll be more likely to be stuck on meds forever… More likely to get asthma … Or a chronic allergic or immunological disease.. Or just bit, snapped at, attacjed, or have their legit service animal attacked, as some people talk about in the article).. It makes me want to bring my service anaconda out– and be like you cant legally ask me my disability or ask for any paperwork on my animal but ill tell you what I keep it fir: to keep your furry animals away from me… Ahh bad joke but really I am just so over it… On a roller coaster… really? (I know some people have them for legit health reasons but so many dont and not to sound selfish but what about people like me– these dogs are taking over stores, malks, planes, healthcare facilitues– I want to scream– what am I supposed to do?) I want a shirt and a bumper sticker and a microphone. 

    Doctors– they're just drug dealers and I am done with there solutions of: there is a steroid shot, here is a taper… Try this shot that we dont really know its mechanism of action…. Ugh.

    Id feel better if there were regulations on service animals so there would be less. Then Id like allergic asthmatics to have rights as well. 

     

  • Pljohns

    Geeze Shea-are you kidding me???  dogs on rides???  You know, I’m a dog lover-have 3 but NO WAY would I inflict them on anyone else.  I ask to have dogs-they didn’t so why should they have to deal with them???  I don’t even let them bother people when they come to visit and I make sure everyone that comes to our house KNOWS before hand that we have dogs and I totally understand if they are allergic and can’t come. I know better than to think I can clean good enough so it doesn’t bother them-there is no way (I didn’t realize this until I got to know you and now-thank you-I have a MUCH better understanding of pet dander and how long it lingers etc).  I have such a better understanding about this since getting to know you and I better understand how hard it is for people with allergies.  You have just as many rights as animal people do BUT they inflict THEIR rights on you and just don’t understand that it affects your LIFE.  These people need to get a grip

    I’m with you-I know some people need them legit but DH suffers from PTSD compliments of desert shield and desert storm and a lot of drug raids in S. America-BUT he would NEVER take a dog out in public where others have to deal with them.  If we are going to a PET store, then yes, we will take our dogs, but I have NEVER taken one to any other type of store and never will.  My Mom would benefit greatly from a service animal (she’s in a wheelchair with multiple physical disabilities from a stroke/broken hip/broken pelvis) but even with that, I don’t know that I could ever let her take it out in public after knowing what I do now. OK-I’ll get off my “I can’t believe it” box now-

    I’m glad you had a good time in spite of everything and i’m right there with you on the claustrophobia of some rides.  I’ve been to Epcot (years ago) and I rode the ride in the round bubble-never again-I was in a panic before I got off of it.  I don’t do well in things like that.  I’m lucky either of our kids EVER wanted to go to any theme park or ride amusement park rides-and I’m perfectly OK with that.  We came to Orlando years ago and the extent of our “parks” was 2 days at Seaworld.  We are within 2 hours of Six Flags in Atlanta and they don’t even want to go there.

    I hope you can rest and recover.  On the pred taper.  I hope you can just rest tonight and hopefully have a good rest of the weekend.

  • LK

    Shea,  After hearing about your day and reading the article you mentioned, all I can say is "Wow".  I'm with you and Lynn on "What in the world are people thinking when they take animals on an amusement park ride??"  

    I've had dogs most of my life and horses, too, but wouldn't dream of assuming others would like to be around them like I do.  

    Several years ago a friend of my dad was boarding a flight and there was another passenger who had a miniature horse as a "service" animal.  The miniature horse "relieved" himself on the plane and all the passengers had to disembark so the plane could be cleaned, thereby inconveniencing all the passengers.  Just like your article mentions.  Now I know quite a bit about training horses, but there is really no way to make sure a horse is "housebroken".  

    Enough said.

    I admit before I learned how animal dander affects you and others I didn't realize what a life-threatening situation coming in contact with it is.  Before my asthma, I didn't realize how badly triggers could affect asthmatics either.  I'm afraid the vast majority of the population just has no idea there is even anything wrong with taking their animals everywhere.  No idea how severely it can affect others.

    I hope your DS had a good day and that you are able to rest and don't have any lingering issues from today.  

  • Shea

    I didnt know about dander much before what happened to me. In fact, in highschool I did a report about Project PUP therapy animals in hospitals like showing what a good thing it was… And I was a dog-lover… I still am– just from a distance now that I am aware Of it affects and I believe in my rights and love myself too.. And it is hard to spread awareness. I mean– I know you guys know that you wish you could love that perfume or that horse barn and not have any issues! My God… I used to be an inconsiderate smoker in early college– I didnt care about my health or anyone else's at that point because I was going through major depression. So I cannot blame others even when I want to. I think the system is the problem. I need my rights to matter too and I have to make people aware because it is an invisible disability that is incompatible with another often invisible disability that has no regulations and lots of fakers or is overprescribed AND I feel alone because not that many people with allergies speak up– and I know why… Because we dont get taken seriously and because dogs are cute. If our reactions arent immediate anaphlaxis it is like they dont matter– well me getting rashes and wheezing and everywhere in public now containing dander because everyone wants to bring their dog everywhere with them at the expense of other people– is causing me to be tortured… I dont know how to fix this. I dont want to not be able to go out or be stuck on huge amounts of prednisone. Doctors dont have the solution for me. I really feel the solution lies in better regulation of service animals and more awareness and rights given to those allergic in being able to deny furry animals entrance into enclosed indoor spaces with others and/or having some indoor enclosed spaces reserved for each. I want to tell those people: It is not a god-given right to take your pet everywhere because it makes YOU more comfortable but it is a God-given right to be able to breathe without a million serious side effect meds bc of people ignorant about allergies and asthma and how their choices affect others. In restaurant they have no smoking signs and areas… Maybe if they cannot regulate animals we need areas. At this point– I will take being treated equal to a dog … just not less than one. Indoor air quality should be made more of a priority. Allergies and asthma should be taken more seriously and more effort be made on environment than on medicating the griwing statistics more and more.

  • Shea

    On a positive note– there really were a lot of fun parts of Epcot looking back at my pics and I enjoyed it a lot even through those bouts. I put some pics here:

  • Pljohns

    Shea-it looks Ike you had a good time in spite of everything and it’s amazing how you go and do things with Tommy-he will ever forget those times.

  • Shea

    Thank you cheer leaders!!!

    Life in the yellow is still much better than life in the red, or staying at home every day and being in the green lol. And when I look back over the past 6 years I really do see progress that I have made from being in deep red to getting here and climbing toward the green… So that is definitely good. 

  • LK

    Shea,  I agree with Melissa and Lynn on all counts.  I am glad you have the pictures to remind you of the good moments even though not all of it was fun.  Your DS will remember the fun part of the day.  I am so impressed with how well you deal with it all.  You have a lot of backbone.  I would've not done most of the rides or been in a sobbing puddle on the floor halfway through the day.  (Well, make that a "sobbing, short of breath, coughing" puddle on the floor!   

  • LK

    Shea, It is so good that you have a long-term view and can see that you HAVE improved over the years.  I know I have had absolutely nothing to do with your improvements, but I am PROUD of you for keeping on keeping on.  You are an inspiration to us all.

  • Shea

    LK oh no you are wrong you have had something to do with my improvements– everyone on here has!!! Every response, every post is helpful to me so please know that! 

    I feel so much better just knowing there are others that have to live in the yellow or have similar issues to mine and hearing about how you make progress through it all– even when we fall back or get stuck it seems like we eventually learn and make some progress. I feel much stringer when I am not facing things alone and I do feel this group makes me stronger. And I love this post–I am always trying to think of good post topics and this is a really good one!

  • LK
    Shea posted:

    Life in the yellow is still much better than life in the red, or staying at home every day and being in the green lol. 

    Shea,  At this point, I am having many days where I am in the "just staying home" mode to stay in the yellow/near green section of the Asthma Zone Chart.  I hope the slight improvements I have seen in the last few days continues so I am able to be braver about venturing out.  

  • LK
    Shea posted:

    LK oh no you are wrong you have had something to do with my improvements– everyone on here has!!! Every response, every post is helpful to me so please know that! 

    I feel so much better just knowing there are others that have to live in the yellow or have similar issues to mine and hearing about how you make progress through it all– even when we fall back or get stuck it seems like we eventually learn and make some progress. I feel much stringer when I am not facing things alone and I do feel this group makes me stronger. And I love this post–I am always trying to think of good post topics and this is a really good one!

    That is so kind of you, Shea.

    I completely agree with your assessment of how much easier it is to deal with our challenges when we are not alone.  Well said!

    Thank you!

  • Shea

    You're welcome   Today I am all about staying home to recover… So there is nothing wrong with staying in, I think that what you are doing is a good approach… Getting comfortable where you are at and then slowly getting brave and venturing out prepared.

    I may have pushed my limits a little yesterday… Today I am so tired I have barely been able to get out of bed. I had this painful burning on the veins in my hand (the same hand that broke out in rash yesterday after being in the same room as the service dog — not sure if that caused it or what). I put some poison ivy anti-itch cream on it that has antihistamine and calamine lotion on it and that helped. My legs and feet have a dull numbing ache–and just huge fatigue. So I am realizing even moreso how hard yesterday was on me. Luckily I am able to stay home and recover and have extra time since Tommy is on summer break from virtual classes. I probably wont do a big venture like yesterday for a while. 

  • LK

    There have been times when I have pushed myself and regretted it the next day or days, so I hear you on that score.  I hope you are feeling much better soon!  

  • Pljohns

    Shea-hoe you are better soon and can rest and recoup today.  I’m the worlds worstat thinking I can do anything, and I try, only to regret it the next day.  Hop you have been able to rest and hope your hand is better!

  • Shea

    Thanks ladies! I hope you both are doung well!

    I have been slowly moving around more– managed a playtime with Tommy and made an easy dinner of boxed Annies Mac n Cheese and carrots and toast. Now Ive just gotta get Tommy in the bath and Ill be able to do a neb treatment and settle in for the rest of the evening. 

  • Kathy P

    I've realized lately that I rarely stay in the green zone….I'm guessing that the "persistent" part of my moderate persistent diagnosis category. And it really stinks! I used to be able to go weeks without having to think about my asthma, but now it's on my mind every day

  • LK

    Kathy,  I am so sorry that you have joined me in the yellow zone lately.  I can't imagine being able to go a day let alone weeks without thinking about my asthma!  Hopefully you will be able to get back to your former level soon.  Did it all start after you broke your wrist?

  • Brenda Silvia-Torma
    LK posted:

    Thanks, Melissa, I am trying to patiently wait to see if I show an improvement with the Xolair shots.  Took the third one yesterday so it will be at least one more month before the doctors say there may be an improvement.  

    Also, the allergist has me scheduled for a VCD test in mid June.  Hoping that give us some useful information, too.

    Lisa, what does a vocal cord dysfunction test entail?  And, is it completed at your local allergist's office? I realize my response is very late to when you posted it! 

  • Kathy P

    Thanks guys – actually, it started about 2 years ago. "Something" changed and I've struggled since to keep control. Not sure if it was the "final hormone shift"  or what set things off. Maybe partly it's because I've tried to get more active since then as well. I think that was when my "mild-intermittent" became "moderate-persistent" 

    It is what it is and I've (mostly) accepted that this is my new normal. But it really stinks! I spend WAY too much time chatting w/ my doc and sitting in his office  I know he's frustrated too because all the usual things aren't working. We just keep plugging away though and adjusting things to get the best control possible.

    The other day, I was musing about  again. I was slacking on my daily nebs and realized that I was feeling things slip. 

  • Pljohns

    kathy-right there with you-I've always been "moderate persistent" and there isn't a day that I don't have to stop and think about something asthma related.  I wish I had a doctor that would work with me and try new things so i had better control but that is left up to me to do and I tend to go over board and drop meds that I probably shouldn't have and then have to add them back but, I don't have the option of dropping something IN EXCHANGE for something else because I don't have a doc that will work with me.

  • LK

    Brenda,  That's okay!   

    The VCD test was amazingly simple.  It was done at the allergists office.  First the nurse had me use a nasal mist decongestant in each nostril.  About 5-10 minutes later she had me use a Lidocaine mist the same way.  After it had taken effect a few minutes later we went to the procedure room.  (I will apologize in advance that I don't know the technical names for the medical equipment.  )  I sat in a high chair and the allergist inserted a long, very thin tube with a camera on the tip into the right nostril far enough where he could see my vocal chords.  I think he had me exhale strongly and do a couple of vocal sounds while he watched my vocal chords.  It was painless.  He showed me the video of it afterward.

    Hope this helps!  

  • Kathy P

    Lisa – I've had a similar scope done to look at my vocal cords when I had an ulceration. Our ENT has also used it to look at ds's sinuses. DS does it w/out the lidocaine spray! 

    Lynne – that stinks that you don't have a doc who will work with you and keep trying things. I'm really lucky that I have a great partnership with mine. He's been my allergist for >20 yrs! I can suggest things to him or ask questions and he's very responsive. Last appointment, I asked about the nasal spray equivalent of Atrovent since mucus is my biggest issue. He didn't think it would help since it's usually used with a runny nose, but he was happy to let me try. And I really think it has made a huge difference in my nighttime cough!